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Year 4 Curriculum

 Autumn – Can you come on a Great American Road Trip?

Learning Objectives:

  • Enhance their locational and place knowledge 
  • Focus on North and South America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries and major cities 
  • Understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of a region in North and South America
  • Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping 
  • Learn to use the eight points of a compass.

Skills Objectives

:There will be many opportunities to use atlas maps and Google Earth images, and to extract information from photographs. Children could also create an illustrated map (of Route 66).

Fieldwork:

If fieldwork in a city is a possibility for your school, children would benefit from carrying out a transect of a UK city, from the outskirts to the centre and then out again, perhaps by a different route. This would help them to appreciate the relationship between a commercial city centre and the surrounding distribution of smaller shops, housing and local amenities.

Cross-Curricular Opportunities:

English: writing a song or poem

Art & design: learning about photos and paintings of dramatic landscapes

Computing: using Google Earth maps and images

Music: composing a musical song or rap.

Spring - How is our country changing?

Learning Objectives:

  • Name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), these aspects have changed over time
  • Understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the United Kingdom
  • mapping to locate countries and describe features
  • Use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of OS maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world
  • Use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

Skills Objectives:

During this topic, display maps of the local region in the classroom. Use them each lesson to locate the region being studied. Children will use maps on a range of scales, from a world map to UK and regional maps. Children will use local area maps during fieldwork and children will study historical maps of the local area.

Fieldwork:

Children will take part in fieldwork in their local area, investigating the question: Is our local area changing? They will observe changes, take photographs, draw field sketches, interview local people and form their own opinions on the changes occurring around them.

Cross-Curricular Opportunities:

English: creating a presentation on sustainable change in the local area

Computing: researching facts on the UK

History: learning about regional effects of World War II PE: learning about planning for the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games

Summer - How does water go round and round?

Learning Objectives:

  • Name and locate (some of) the UK’s most significant rivers and mountain environments
  • Describe features of a river and a mountain environment in the UK
  • Learn how rivers and mountains are formed • Understand where rivers and mountains fit into the water cycle

Skills Objectives:

Children will be able to use OS and other (e.g. road) maps to locate and follow rivers. On a fieldtrip to a river (or a mountain) environment children will be able to plan the journey, provide and follow direction instructions, locate themselves on the map and annotate it with their observations. This provides opportunities to develop ‘real world’ work on grid references.

Fieldwork:

A stream often provides a safer environment for making observations and measurements than a river. You might also provide an opportunity for them to visit a river flowing through an urban environment to see human use and intervention.

Cross-Curricular Opportunities:

English: river and mountain stories and poem, e.g. The ascent of Everest by John Hunt, The river by Valerie Bloom, A stream becomes a river by Margo Fallis, The sparkling river by Susan Perrow Maths: learning about timing and measurement of water flow

Science: identifying the part played by evaporation and condensation in the water cycle and associating the rate of evaporation with temperature; learning about solids and liquids; learning about forces.