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Geography Curriculum

Curriculum by Years

Year 3

Autumn - Where on earth are we?

Learning Objectives:
• Improve their locational knowledge through identifying the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich Meridian and time zones (including day and night)
• Practise geographical skills through using maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate features studied
• Use the eight points of the compass to build their knowledge of the wider world.

Skills Objective:
Children will use maps, atlases and globes with an opportunity for making a map. Children will be comparing how globes and different types of map represent our world.

Fieldwork opportunities:
Not in this unit

Cross-Curricular Opportunities:
English: writing text for a picture book or to recount as a story without words: writing game rules; listening to how John Harrison solved the problem of longitude
Maths: learning about scale, direction and compass points; learning about properties of a sphere; time and the 24-hour clock; angles
Science: seeing the Earth from space
Art & design: making a papier-mâché globe; an invented game
Computing: writing a new game
Design & technology: making a papier-mâché globe; inventing a game.

Spring - Is climate cool?

Learning Objectives:
• Locate some of the world’s climate zones on a globe or map, name examples and have some understanding of them
• Describe and give examples of the variety of biomes and vegetation belts
• Use appropriate geographical vocabulary to describe weather, climate, climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts.

Skills Objectives:
Children will use, read, learn to extract information from a wide variety of maps of the world (accessible on the Internet) and interpret them. They will build on the previous Unit: Where On Earth Are We?

Fieldwork Opportunities:
Organise a visit to a deciduous forest or woodland and find out about the native trees of our temperate forest biome. Try to arrange a talk from a park or countryside ranger to discover more about the issues affecting the flora, fauna and countryside of, or near/nearest to, your local area.

Cross-Curricular Opportunities:
English: reading factual information; recording factual information in writing, on a diagram; writing a case study, a script; discussing ideas and information; practising presentation skills; speaking in an interview
Maths: learning about temperature; measuring in millimetres
Science: researching plant and animal habitats; learning about temperature, plant and animal life.
Art & design: creating a wall collage of visual material, an informational poster
Computing: writing a PowerPoint presentation.

Summer - Do you like to be beside the seaside?

Learning Objectives:
• Extend their knowledge and understanding beyond the local area to include the United Kingdom
• Name and locate (some) counties and cities of the United Kingdom
• Learn about key topographical features (including coast and rivers) to understand how some of these aspects have changed over time
• Understand similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the United Kingdom (SW England) and a region in a European country (Costa Blanca, Spain)
• Describe and understand key aspects of the human geography of coasts, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity etc.

Skills Objectives
The children will use maps including OS 1:50000, atlases, Google Earth as appropriate to the task, making their own decisions about which to choose.
Use 8 points of compass, symbols & keys Map work using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

Fieldwork:
This unit includes opportunities for fieldwork such as a fieldtrip to a coastal area.

Cross-curricular Opportunities:
English: using descriptive language; using persuasive writing
Science: learning about beach, cliff and sea habitats
Art & Design: designing and creating posters and presentations to promote a coastal location
Computing: using Google Earth to explore the world
Music: singing a song about the seaside

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Year 4

Autumn – Can you come on a Great American Road Trip?

Learning Objectives:
• Enhance their locational and place knowledge
• Focus on North and South America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries and major cities
• Understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of a region in North and South America
• Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping
• Learn to use the eight points of a compass.

Skills Objectives:
There will be many opportunities to use atlas maps and Google Earth images, and to extract information from photographs. Children could also create an illustrated map (of Route 66).

Fieldwork:
If fieldwork in a city is a possibility for your school, children would benefit from carrying out a transect of a UK city, from the outskirts to the centre and then out again, perhaps by a different route. This would help them to appreciate the relationship between a commercial city centre and the surrounding distribution of smaller shops, housing and local amenities.

Cross-Curricular Opportunities:
English: writing a song or poem
Art & design: learning about photos and paintings of dramatic landscapes
Computing: using Google Earth maps and images
Music: composing a musical song or rap.

Spring - How is our country changing?

Learning Objectives:
• Name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), these aspects have changed over time
• Understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the United Kingdom
• mapping to locate countries and describe features
• Use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of OS maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world
• Use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

Skills Objectives:
During this topic, display maps of the local region in the classroom. Use them each lesson to locate the region being studied. Children will use maps on a range of scales, from a world map to UK and regional maps. Children will use local area maps during fieldwork and children will study historical maps of the local area.

Fieldwork:
children will take part in fieldwork in their local area, investigating the question: Is our local area changing? They will observe changes, take photographs, draw field sketches, interview local people and form their own opinions on the changes occurring around them.

Cross-Curricular Opportunities:
English: creating a presentation on sustainable change in the local area
Computing: researching facts on the UK
History: learning about regional effects of World War II
PE: learning about planning for the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games

Summer - How does water go round and round?

Learning Objectives:
• Name and locate (some of) the UK’s most significant rivers and mountain environments
• Describe features of a river and a mountain environment in the UK
• Learn how rivers and mountains are formed
• Understand where rivers and mountains fit into the water cycle

Skills Objectives:
Children will be able to use OS and other (e.g. road) maps to locate and follow rivers. On a fieldtrip to a river (or a mountain) environment children will be able to plan the journey, provide and follow direction instructions, locate themselves on the map and annotate it with their observations. This provides opportunities to develop ‘real world’ work on grid references.

Fieldwork:
A stream often provides a safer environment for making observations and measurements than a river. You might also provide an opportunity for them to visit a river flowing through an urban environment to see human use and intervention.

Cross-Curricular Opportunities:
English: river and mountain stories and poem, e.g. The ascent of Everest by John Hunt, The river by Valerie Bloom, A stream becomes a river by Margo Fallis, The sparkling river by Susan Perrow
Maths: learning about timing and measurement of water flow
Science: identifying the part played by evaporation and condensation in the water cycle and associating the rate of evaporation with temperature; learning about solids and liquids; learning about forces.

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Year 5

Autumn - Can the earth shake rattle and roll?

Learning Objectives:
Describe and understand the key aspects of volcanoes and earthquakes
Understand that the distribution of earthquakes and volcanoes follows a pattern
Learn about the ‘Pacific Ring of Fire’

Skills Objectives:
Maps to locate volcanoes and earthquakes worldwide, plate (tectonic) boundaries involving maps of the world’s oceans as well as land, interactive map and satellite imagery of Ecuador.

Fieldwork:
This unit creates a good opportunity to introduce children to the main groups of rocks – sedimentary (e.g. sandstone and limestone), igneous (e.g. granite) and metamorphic (e.g. slate and schist). Discover which of these are present in your local area and visit appropriate localities. Volcanic rocks are a sub-division of igneous. Pumice stone is one light and bubbly form of volcanic lava which you may have in your bathroom. A museum with a good geological display would be worth a visit to see a wider range.

Cross-curricular opportunities:
English: reading an Earthquake short story by an Australian primary pupil; reading Willard Price’s story Volcano Adventure, learning about Greek and Roman mythology
Maths: learning about measurement of temperature and earthquake scales; using +ve and –ve and large numbers
Science: learning about change of state – melting and solidification of rock (lava, magma)/heating and cooling (of water and ice for reversibility)
Art: looking at and creating paintings of volcanoes (e.g. JMW Turner, Church)
Drama: dramatising a volcanic eruption with explosive movement and lava flows; performing a volcano safety drill
History: researching famous volcanic explosions of the past, including Vesuvius (Herculaneum and Pompeii)
Music: for volcanoes, Handel’s Music for the Royal Fireworks; for earthquakes, children creating drumming music.

Spring - Where should we go on holiday?

Learning Objectives:
• Use maps to focus on countries, cities and regions in Europe
• Be taught to understand a region of another European country
• Be taught to understand some of the physical and human processes that shape a region
• Extend their knowledge and understanding beyond the local area to include Europe. This will include the location and characteristics of a range of the world’s most significant human and physical features.

Skills Objectives:
This unit has numerous opportunities for using both physical and political maps and globes, particularly during Lesson 1. The children will use maps to locate the Alps and identify the physical features of the region. They will also use base maps to create their own maps of the region.

Fieldwork:
This unit focuses on a distant location, but you could create opportunities for local fieldwork. The children could investigate the local tourist industry, and consider the impact on the region. You may also wish to compare the topography of the Alps to that of the local area, e.g. by visiting the highest local peak.

Cross-curricular links:
English: writing discussion texts on tourism in the Alps
Science: learning about forces and friction in mountain formation
Art & design: modelling the Alps in 3d, designing local alpine houses, designing an ec0-resort, modelling avalanche management, simulating an avalanche
Computing: creating a digital book with photos and ¬captions on mountain formations, creating mobile apps to inform tourists about the Alpine region, and their own area
Modern foreign languages: French, German and Italian are spoken in the countries studied.

Summer - What is it like in the Amazon?

Learning Objectives:
• Extend their knowledge and understanding beyond their local area to include South America
• Develop their use of geographical knowledge, understanding and skills to enhance their locational and place knowledge
• Locate the world's countries using maps, and concentrate on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries and major cities Understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region in South America
• Describe and understand key aspects of physical and human geography
• Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computing mapping to locate countries and describe features studied.

Skills Objectives:
This unit has lots of opportunities for both using and creating maps at a range of scales. During this unit, children will begin with world maps, before moving on to maps of South America and Brazil. This allows them to develop their skills in locating and describing features studied.

Fieldwork:
The Amazon is a little too far for fieldwork: however, this unit does lend itself to opportunities for local area fieldwork. Children can investigate their local area, considering its change in their locality, as well as studying any protected areas using the same enquiry process as their study of the Amazon region.

Cross-curricular opportunities:
English: speaking and listening: poetry: research skills, note-taking, non- chronological reports
Maths: direction and compass points, distance
Science: habitats and adaptation, states of matter – properties of liquids
Computing: making an animation, e-safety - using the internet safely and effectively for research
History: exploration, food and farming

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Y6

Autumn - Where does all of our stuff come from?

Learning Objectives:
• Describe and understand key aspects of human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water.
• Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied.

Skills Objectives:
During this unit, the children will work on a variety of mapping tasks, from mapping the locations where their clothes and lunch originate, to working with climate zone maps. They will also look at the journeys of various familiar foodstuffs, household products and recycled items.

Fieldwork:
The children will go on a field visit to investigate the products available in the local area, and find out about which products are produced locally and which are imported. They will be posing their own enquiry questions and collecting the information to answer their questions.

Cross-curricular Opportunities:
English: compiling a leaflet explaining clothing production, with advice on ethical consumerism : scripting a documentary discussing issues involved in buying locally produced versus imported products, writing an adventure story on the journey of a product.
Mathematics: creating a frequency chart and bar graph showing countries of origin for products at home, handling data to create tables, graphs, and charts. Calculating food miles.
Science: learning about seasons, the life cycle of plants and seed dispersal
Art & design: drawing and annotating: school uniform, fruits and their origins.
History: discussing exploration and trade, with a link to Tudor times.

Spring - Are we damaging our world?

Learning Objectives:
• Describe and understand key aspects of the distribution of natural resources including energy, minerals and water
• Use maps, atlases and globes to locate countries and describe features studied
• Use the eight points of a compass, symbols and keys to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world
• Use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

Skills Objectives:
The children will use maps and atlases throughout this unit to locate different countries, regions, oceans and habitats. They will learn to read a range of different types of map, including those that show mineral distribution around the world.

Fieldwork:
This unit includes opportunities for fieldwork within the school grounds, looking at how the school grounds can be made more attractive to wildlife and investigating how sustainable the school is, and suggesting areas for improvement. The children will pose their own specific enquiry question, before collecting evidence from around the school.

Cross-curricular opportunities:
English: writing a script, producing a fact sheet, formal letter writing and persuasive texts, report writing.
Science: learning about minerals, learning about energy production, learning about habitats, learning about marine life.
Computing: researching online, creating a comic strip, creating a website.

Summer - How will our world look in the future?

Learning Objectives:
Describe and understand key aspects of: −physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle −human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water
Learn geographical skills and fieldwork: use maps and symbols to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom.
Use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

Skills Objectives:
The children will work with local maps to identify the current features of the area. They will also look at historical maps, in comparison to modern maps, noting any changes to the area. The children may create their own maps of the future.

Fieldwork:
This unit has many opportunities for fieldwork and any of the lessons could potentially include an element of fieldwork. The children will plan and carry out fieldwork activities, answering enquiry questions such as: What, in our region, should we preserve for the future? They will also look at the types of housing and industry in the region. Key to this unit is understanding and considering the views and needs of the community.

Cross-curricular opportunities:
English: writing surveys/questionnaires, reports, captions, a job advert, persuasive speech, diary entry, annotating maps.
Maths: interpreting a line graph
Art & design: artwork, exploring the work of L.S. Lowry
Computing: researching online, using a mapping tool, creating an app or website
Design & technology: learning about architecture and housing design
History: learning about local history
PSCHE: considering the needs of others, developing community spirit.